Connect with us

News

Five Indian American Members of Congress feted at Indiaspora Gala

Published

on

Congressmembers Pramila Jayapal, Tulsi Gabbard, Raja Krishnamoorthi and Ami Bera at the Indiaspora Gala 2017 in Washington DC.

Congressmembers Pramila Jayapal, Tulsi Gabbard, Raja Krishnamoorthi and Ami Bera at the Indiaspora Gala 2017 in Washington DC.

(L-R) Congressmembers Pramila Jayapal, Tulsi Gabbard, Raja Krishnamoorthi and Ami Bera at the Indiaspora Gala 2017 in Washington DC.

WASHINGTON, DC (Diya TV) — Were it not for Donald Trump’s stunning win in November, the political story of Election 2016 could arguably be the ascent of the Indian-American community, who surprisingly now have five members in the United States Congress.

Kamala Harris of California, long rumored as a potential Presidential candidate, is now the first-ever Indian-American to serve in the U.S. Senate.

Raja Krishnamoorthi, a Chicago-area businessman endorsed by President Barack Obama, won a House seat in his second try.

Seattle’s Pramila Jayapal, a disciple of Bernie Sanders, became the first Indian-American woman to serve in the House after capturing Washington’s 7th district.

Silicon Valley’s Ro Khanna, in his second attempt in California’s 17th district (and third overall), upset eight term Congressman Mike Honda.

Despite a campaign fundraising scandal involving his father, Dr. Ami Bera secured his third term in California’s 7th district south of Sacramento.

In addition, Tulsi Gabbard, the nation’s first Hindu in Congress, overwhelmingly won her third term representing Hawaii’s 2nd district.

All of them are Democrats and all were honored at the Indiaspora Gala, an Indian-American centered inaugural ball.

“Our legacy is nothing that we’re going to do. Our legacy is built on what the next-generation does,” said Rep. Bera before the crowd of 500 that came to the Marriott Marquis in Washington, DC.

It was the second time M.R. Rangaswami, founder of Indiaspora, organized a gala of this nature. Four years ago, it was pegged around President Obama’s reelection. But given the historic nature of this election to the Indian-American community, the date was moved up to coincide with Congress’ swearing-in date.

“We’re 1% of the population and we’re finally 1% of Congress itself,” said Rangaswami.

Rep. Pramila Jayapal added “that we, Indian Americans, have a presence and have power in this country that matches now politically everything else that we do.”

The bipartisan gala brought scores of members of Congress to attend, including many heavily involved in the US-India relationship like Republican Senator from Alaska, Dan Sullivan.

“It’s an incredible community in terms of the rising political influence, but also in terms of what the Indian-American community is doing throughout the country,” said Sullivan.

Houston Democratic Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee believes this new crop of colleagues will “make a real mark on the United States Congress primarily because they bring to this nation a recognition that we are a nation of many. And out of many, comes one. And comes unity.”

Former Democratic Vice Presidential hopeful and current Virginia Senator Tim Kaine once oversaw the US-India relationship as the chair of the subcommittee in foreign relations. He appointed a number of Indian-Americans to cabinet posts when he served as governor of Virginia and believes strongly despite the upcoming change in administrations, “the ties are so natural” that the bond between the US and India will continue to grow.

It’s a viewpoint shared by Democratic member of Congress Nancy Pelosi of San Francisco, who told Diya TV, “when people come from India to the United States, with their entrepreneurship, with their family values, with their commitment to community, they make America, more American.”

“No matter which way the political winds blow,” said Rep. Gabbard, “the commitment is there on behalf of the leaders of this country to strengthen the US-India friendship.”

Other dignitaries in attendance included United States Assistant Secretary of Commerce Arun Kumar, potential U.S. Ambassador to India in the Trump administration, Ashley J. Tellis, DC Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Sri Srinivasan, New York Democratic Congressmembers Joe Crowley and Carolyn Maloney, Indiana Republican Congressman Todd Rokita, U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs, Nisha Desai Biswal, Indian Ambassador to the U.S. Navtej Sarna, Neera Tanden, President of the Center for American Progress and Nina Davuluri, Miss America 2014.

News

President Donald Trump celebrates Diwali in the White House

Published

on

On the eve of Diwali, Indian Americans - Hindus, Sikhs, Jains,, including staff members of the Trump Cabinet gathered to light the ceremonial Diya to symbolize the victory of Light over darkness and good over evil

WASHINGTON (Diya TV) — On the eve of Diwali, Indian Americans – Hindus, Sikhs, Jains,, including staff members of the Trump Cabinet gathered to light the ceremonial Diya to symbolize the victory of Light over darkness and good over evil.

Continue Reading

News

EXCLUSIVE: Preet Bharara gives the backstory on his firing by President Trump

Published

on

In a keynote address to the South Asian Bar Association, former U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara recounted in detail the weekend he was fired as U.S. Attorney, what he plans to do moving forward and why it's important that attorneys from diverse backgrounds get involved in public service.

WASHINGTON (Diya TV) — In a keynote address to the South Asian Bar Association, former U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara recounted in detail the weekend he was fired as U.S. Attorney, what he plans to do moving forward and why it’s important that attorneys from diverse backgrounds get involved in public service.

Continue Reading

Featured

Democrat Doug Jones beats Republican Roy Moore for Alabama Senate seat

Published

on

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — In one of the most intensely fought elections in 2017, Democrat Doug Jones, a former prosecutor has defeated the scandal-clad Republican Roy Moore. Moore who had the endorsement of President Trump, despite allegations of inappropriate sexual behaviour, was defeated on Tuesday in Alabama, a deeply conservative state that last elected a Democratic senator 25 years ago. The upset delivered a surprising victory for the Democrats shaving the Republican Senate majority down to a single seat.

Roy Moore, the Republican candidate who was abandoned by a majority of his own party leaders, lost to Democrat Doug Jones in a battle that wasn’t a battle until the allegations of sexual misconduct began surfacing, including by a woman who was under-age at the time she was allegedly assaulted. Former Presidential candidate Mitt Romney tweeted:


Moore was running to fill a seat left vacant by Jeff Sessions who is Trump’s attorney general and lost to Jones, a former US attorney who had prosecuted two members of the Ku Klux Klan for a 1963 bombing of a church in which four African Americans girls had been killed.
Just hours before the polls opened President Trump tweeted:

But despite the presidential endorsement, Moore was defeated by Jones becoming the first Democrat Alabama has sent to the US senate since 1992. His upset victory owes much to Moore’s flawed candidacy, but was pulled off by the Democratic party machine that poured money and resources sensing a chance, howsoever small at the time, of victory. Including a helping hand from Alabama-native and former NBA star Charles Barkley, who campaigned for Doug Jones. He told CNN “Roy Moore was an embarrassment. I am just so proud of my state. We’ve got some amazing people here and they rose up today”

President Trump congratulated Jones on his victory, over twitter:

After initially holding back his endorsement, Trump had come to fully embrace Moore, arguing that if the allegations were proven, the Republican candidate should step aside. But he needed every vote in the Senate to push through legislative agenda, which has had a patchy run thus far.

Trump broke with most members of his party, including the senior Republican senator from Alabama Richard Shelby who had announced they would not vote for Moore. Jeff Flake, a Republican senator from Arizona, public announced he had donated to Doug Jones’ campaign. Roy Moore hasn’t conceded to Jones and has asked for a recount stating, “It’s not over. I demand a recount. We need to wait for God.”

Continue Reading

Trending

Diya TV , Inc. © 2017 All Rights Reserved